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Jun 24 16 9:08 PM

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Hello,

My wife just came home with this under her arm.  It appears to be number one of twenty five "state edition" prints.  I was wondering if anyone could give us an idea of it's value?

Funny thing is that we kind of wanted one of these prints for the house and my wife finds it on the curb.

Thanks,
image
Paul
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#1 [url]

Jun 26 16 4:46 PM

Can't really see it clearly, but it looks as if it might be part of the "estate editions" which were published posthumously and signed by Nagel's widow, Jennifer Dumas. Is that the signature on the piece? FWIW, if a piece is not and original (which were often not signed) or signed in pencil by Patrick Nagel, it probably has no serious value. 

Rob Frankel
Author, "The Artist Who Loved Women" A biography of Patrick Nagel

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#3 [url]

Jun 26 16 6:18 PM

If you simply refer to the Nagel book, there were 25 signed and number estate edition, and there is a corresponding small star on the right cheek.  In fact, if I recall, this particularly edition commands a premium.
 

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#4 [url]

Dec 28 16 11:06 PM

Hi, yes piece has the silver star on her right cheek (left side), and has a pencil signature to the right and the words 'State 1' in pencil on the left. Is there a difference when you talk of 'Estate' or 'State'?
My understanding is that the State pieces had some hand painting on them? So it is unlikely to be signed by his wife??

Other info, original frame Mirage Edition, 1981, local to Melrose LA.

Please advise.

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#5 [url]

Dec 29 16 11:33 AM

Pieces signed by Nagel's wife are all posthumously released and bear the signature "Jennifer Dumas" pretty clearly.

Rob Frankel
Author, "The Artist Who Loved Women" A biography of Patrick Nagel

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#6 [url]

Jan 21 17 1:59 AM

Hello Paul,

Most of this information can be verified by looking in the book, Nagel: The Art of Patrick Nagel on page 155.

  • Print title: Papillon
  • Print relase: June 1982
  • Print type: lifetime-released, limited edition serigraph (aka "silkscreen") poster
  • Printed by Jeff Wasserman of Wasserman Silkscreen
  • Print size: 25" x 17" with six colors
  • Edition Size
  •      1000 signed in screen (aka "s-i-s") which means the signature is part of the screen printing process. This is "unsigned" by art standards.
  •      250 hand signed and numbered by Patrick Nagel in pencil
  •      20 Artist's Proofs (marked "a/p")
  •      25 state edition prints, marked "State 1" in pencil by Patrick Nagel, along with his signature,  with an hand painted star on the cheek and one of the ribbons on the mask is a metallic silver ink instead of yellow in all other versions
  •     Double images, numbers unknow, but released in both signed and signed in screen versions, per Mirage's price lists, even though the book does not list these.

I also have one of these in the "state 1" version and I love it. 

For Papillon, like Just Looking, and Mirage, Patrick Nagel and Karl decided to release the prints in what would now be commonly known as a "variant" version. While most serigraphs released in these days have a variant that just introduces different colors, for Nagel's work, the variant versions either added or removed elements from the image. Just Looking's SP version omits the small text under the image, and was marked with an "SP" in pencil, by Nagel, and a number adjacent to the SP. The print known as Mirage omitted the title running veritcally in the upper right corner. For Papillon, they did something quite special, in that they added and hand painted star on the model's cheek and changed one set of ribbons from yellow to metallic silver.

I am not sure why they decided to call these a "State Edition" and it may have been something done in collaboration with Papillon Gallery to offer a unique subset of prints for Nagel collectors. For the art work, each iteration of a print is often called a "state". So for this print, there is hand signed and numbered state, the signed in screen state, the "State 1" state, the Aritist's Proofs state, and the double image, which came both in a signed in screen (a.k.a. "unsigned") state, and hand signed state.

Don't confuse the "State Edition" of this piece with the "Estate Editions," which was a series of three large serigraphs released by the Estate of Patrick Nagel, his wife, Jennifer Dumas long after Pat died.

Regards,

Nagel Angel
22350 wrote:
Hello,

My wife just came home with this under her arm.  It appears to be number one of twenty five "state edition" prints.  I was wondering if anyone could give us an idea of it's value?

Funny thing is that we kind of wanted one of these prints for the house and my wife finds it on the curb.

Thanks,
image
Paul

 

Last Edited By: Nagel Angel Jan 21 17 2:14 AM. Edited 3 times.

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#7 [url]

Mar 8 17 9:59 PM

Thank you Nagel Angel !!!

This helps and your explanation is greatly appreciated, we love the piece and are happy to have so much information on it, it's amazing how unhelpful the local LA galleries and auction house are when we approached them, I get that Nagel may be a little crass to them, but their lack of knowledge for a local icon is astounding.

We are proudly hanging our star cheeked silver ribboned girl in our office.

Thank you once again everyone!

Judith & Paul, Hollywood.

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#8 [url]

Mar 8 17 10:25 PM

Great information. Always be careful of your sources, though.  Through my research, I discovered a number of errors in The Art of Patrick Nagel, so be sure to verify whatever you find.

Also, I have created another discussion group that's much easier to navigate.  It's just started, but it's free and you're welcome to join to get the action going:https://groups.io/g/PatrickNagel/topics

Rob Frankel
Author, "The Artist Who Loved Women" A biography of Patrick Nagel

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#9 [url]

Mar 9 17 10:08 PM

In the interest of continuing to educate folks about the errors or omissions in the book, I am reposting text from one of my posts at this same forum back in 2013. I am a data gatherer and cataloger by my nature. My information was based on years of checking print data, comparing images and details over time, data from auctions, content the estate released and Mirage price lists, which often included the variations on the prints sometimes omitted in the book. Here is that post from 2013 at this forum:

As you know, the book is riddled with factual errors and omissions.

An AP serigraph of "N:Telephone" mislabeled as an original acrylic on board (page 9)

Acrylics on board mislabeled as being on canvas:
  • page 19
  • page 33
  • page 46
  • page 57
  • page 96
  • page 115
(For all the page 19, I know of the existence of canvas versions, as many appeared in the calendars or through other sources.) 

Images of the prints being mislabeled as being the original on canvas:
  • page 88 (The original is in the colors yellow and grey with much sharper features.)
  • page 111
 Bad pre-Photoshop faked versions of the following prints that badly misrepresent the actual print:
  • page 147: Black and White Robe (makes it look grey scale version of the full color version)
  • page 150: Special Proof of "Just Looking" (omits text below and above image area)

And reversed "Standying Lady" and "Wasserman" in the prints sections. The estate sold a hand-signed, never framed Mirage Ship Double several years ago, and it was marked as a double by Nagel.  It is not in the book along with any mention of the signed in screen copies of "Shades."  It is owned by Neil St.Jon, the fella who worked on the film "Who Killed the Electric Car?" and also attempted to start a documentary on Nagel that I think he may have interviewed you for, Nagelite.  :)

There are other signed in screen doubles of Mirage Ship out there, but not many. (I know you know this, Nagelite, but for the benefit of others...) The super-wonderful thing about Nagel's printer's proofs, is they are marked as such, not just "P/P" but fully "Printer's Proof" and then signed by Patrick, so even if they are absent in the book, it is clear they are real because no forger would be able to fake two full words like "printer's proof" and have it pass.

That is just to clear these up versus the unsigned printer's test pages, e.g. the "Santiago Specials" that are outside of the edition.

I wish Nagel had signed my copy of "Mask,"  the one that he chose to keep and hang in his studio that I purchased directly from the estate, 
but I know that would feel weird when I suspect Patrick never thought it would ever leave his house. Thankfully, Jennifer agreed to provide me a COA for it.

Cheers,NA 


Here the link to the at 2013 post:
http://patricknagel.lefora.com/reply/37271213/Anyone-going-to-Clarks-previewJanuary-10-11#reply-37271213

Often times this information came from comparing images. For example, in one or two of the calendars the estate released, they included an image of "Shads" that clearly showed a signed in screen (SIS) version of that print, even though they did not list the SIS version in the book, which TBFA than saw and restated the mistake. "Shades" has shown up several times on eBay in the signed in screen, SIS, unsigned state.

Sometimes being a bit obessive and also a cataloguer at heart is a benefit. ;)
robfrankel wrote:
Great information. Always be careful of your sources, though.  Through my research, I discovered a number of errors in The Art of Patrick Nagel, so be sure to verify whatever you find.

Also, I have created another discussion group that's much easier to navigate.  It's just started, but it's free and you're welcome to join to get the action going:https://groups.io/g/PatrickNagel/topics

Regards,

NA

Last Edited By: Nagel Angel Mar 9 17 11:54 PM. Edited 4 times.

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