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Feb 19 17 11:37 AM

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For those of you buying, selling or just holding on to your pieces, there seems to be  good news:

My survey of lifetime, signed & numbered Nagel serigraphs indicates a strong upturn in values. Not all items are selling at super, "wishful thinking" prices, but over the last three years, prices and values are definitely up.  Pieces that were selling for $300 - $400 a year or two ago are now being listed -- and selling -- for $1000, give or take.  Black Robe just went out for $2000+ at auction and even Joan Collins, the much-maligned serigraph, is double what it was selling for a few short years ago.  Hanson and various sizes of Paper Mill are at or over $1000 and the elusive Shades is currently listed on Ebay for $1,495.

Visiting at a gellary opening last night, I was fortunate to talk with several Nagel collectors who were active during the early 80s.  Everything seems to confirm my thesis in the book that the serigraphs number far below their issue count.  My guess -- and that's what it is, a guess -- is that less than half of all lifetime, numbered, signed serigraphs are gone, discarded, damaged or destroyed.

 

Rob Frankel
Author, "The Artist Who Loved Women" A biography of Patrick Nagel

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Mar 9 17 10:19 PM

I am concerned about this comment: "  Hanson and various sizes of Paper Mill are at or over $1000 "

There are not various sizes of "Paper Mill," unless you are referring to the doubles, which are 25" x 34," which is just twice as wide as the original 17" x 25
print.

If you are thinking there are two sizes because of an auction on eBay, this is one of the frequent frauds or misrepresentations that folks needs to look out for.
Paper Mill, like Park South, was frequently cut out of the book and framed. Some sellers did this themselves and know what they have. Others find these at thift stores and think they have found something of value.

HOW TO PROECT YOURSELF: Always ask about the print's actul size without the matting and frame.

Example: Check out this auction: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Patrick-Nagel-PAPER-MILL-Hand-Signed-Numbered-1980-3-250-/201825264712?hash=item2efdb92448:g:Y~kAAOSwa~BYd-oQ

If you turn to page 39 in the book, you will see that is an full page image of the the serigraph "Paper Mill," which NOT COINCIDENTALLY is ALSO numbered 3 of 250, which is what this seller thinks they are selling. The page is not 17" x 25" so asking the seller, "What is the size of the actual image area?" solves this not too hard to figure out misrepresented item. Less easy to determine are APs of Park South Gallery, which also got a full page color plate in the book on page 23.

I reached out to this seller and they did not respond, as I would normally not call out a seller in an active auction in this manner.
Someitmes it is an innocent misake, but willful ignorance should make buyers beware. At least they note the size of the image in the listing.

If you don't have "Nagel: The Art of Patrick Nagel," and you are just starting to collect Nagel prints, buying the book is the best thing you can do along with asking questions here, to learn what to look for.

For those of you buying, selling or just holding on to your pieces, there seems to be  good news:
My survey of lifetime, signed & numbered Nagel serigraphs indicates a strong upturn in values. Not all items are selling at super, "wishful thinking" prices, but over the last three years, prices and values are definitely up.  Pieces that were selling for $300 - $400 a year or two ago are now being listed -- and selling -- for $1000, give or take.  Black Robe just went out for $2000+ at auction and even Joan Collins, the much-maligned serigraph, is double what it was selling for a few short years ago.  Hanson and various sizes of Paper Mill are at or over $1000 and the elusive Shades is currently listed on Ebay for $1,495.

Visiting at a gellary opening last night, I was fortunate to talk with several Nagel collectors who were active during the early 80s.  Everything seems to confirm my thesis in the book that the serigraphs number far below their issue count.  My guess -- and that's what it is, a guess -- is that less than half of all lifetime, numbered, signed serigraphs are gone, discarded, damaged or destroyed.

 

 

Last Edited By: Nagel Angel Mar 10 17 10:40 AM. Edited 5 times.

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