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enzo

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Mar 6 13 7:34 AM

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Realized I don't know who or what "Lorraine" was. I probably should, being the owner of 1/250. Who was this poster done for?

enzo

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#1 [url]

Mar 6 13 10:19 AM

Enzo,

Lorraine was probably an experiment away from corporate sponsorship of the printing process.  I do not know too much about its history, although the woman-with-flower-in-hair theme was a favorite of Pat.  Here is what Todd Bingham says about this beautiful print:


Lorraine

1981\ 250 s/n \ 40 a/p \ 1100 unsigned
An under-appreciated poster, Lorraine is classic Nagel. The flower and bird design augmenting the lines of the model, setting the soft tone of the composition. Lorraine never sold well, but it's one of our favorites and is really what Nagel was all about (in talking with him, he didn't seem all that wild with the bigger, glitzier prints that came later.)


BTW--Very nice scoring 1/250.  I suspect that print probably belonged in the collection of Karl Bornstein at one time. 


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#2 [url]

Mar 6 13 6:40 PM

the uniqueness of this nagel, is there any other that has the year, year only, as large text at the bottom of the poster? i wonder what his intention was here

you have what appears to be the action of a hummingbird, hovering in flight at a flower, but the beak of a sparrow. hummingbirds are a unique animal. no natural predators, the males can be very violent and aggressive towards each other. do not know what patrick was trying to achieve by association here as he was with other mostly male mostly predator animals. the bird in Piedmont Graphics is closer in physical anatomy (longer beak) to a hummingbird. it would be interesting to know the exact species of bird in this picture

she's got this unique hair bouffant that sticks out at three o'clock as opposed to a common nagel hair bouffant which is at 12 o'clock

what is most unique about Lorraine is probably that it is a complete turn around from the usual nagel woman in the aspect of the space around her head:
-bouffant to the side instead of up
-although Malke-Sage, Iowa Argonomics, Mother Earth Paris, Hanson and Art Expo Cal have the full head lower down the image, the spaces above are occupied. the space above Lorraine's head is purposefully blank, similar too but more so than Piedmont Graphics

there is also the flower. a lily i presume, like Malke-Sage and the untitled work on page 14 of the book. Casa Lupita has roses. Silver Sunbeam has that wierd cactus flower

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enzo

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#3 [url]

Mar 6 13 9:56 PM

Thanks nagelite. Anyone have the details?

Yes, it was Bornstein's. 

Tom, interesting point about the bird. Not sure if it's a hummingbird but it seems interested in the nectar, so maybe. If I had to guess on the meaning—the woman seems to be in a submissive posture, as if offering the flower to the bird, which could represent a man. The woman seems dissatisfied or detached, however, pointing to the fact that the bird is only there for the flower. From this, the composition suggests to me a comment on men who fail to appreciate the entirety of a female, seeing female beauty as a consumable.

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#4 [url]

Mar 6 13 11:05 PM





Enzo,

There is similarity to the original design of Nagel's piece for Park South Gallery which had a woman with a flower in her hair very much like this with a bit more of Billie Holiday thrown in.  (It also had a flying keyboard, so it probably was not too terrible it did not become the final poster.)

I think the flower is a daffodil and the bird might be a sparrow.
(Nagel was not John James Audubon; the bird might be colored
in a way that suited Pat's design needs rather than reflect real life...much as
the Kanji [writing] on Paper Mill isn't an actual Kanji either.) 

This in an intriguing piece.  Like Hanson, Nagel put the figure pretty low in the image.

The next piece, Mirage is the first to be released with an SP version with no text (Just Looking still had the Just Looking at the top, but not the text at the bottom for its SP), since Mirage Ship.

The way Lorraine is coming out of the frame is a bit like Silver Sunbean, but also the bird in Piedmont Book Company.

I like to think of this piece as if Lorraine, the woman was filling the frame the way the figure in Mirage is, but something has caught her eye and she had decided to bend down to get a closer look.
Personally, I sense movement in this figure, moving out of the frame, where Hanson seems still and motionless.




When I was emailing back and forth with Barry Haun, he make it clear to me that the way Jennifer and Pat lived was very much not of their time (the 80s), in that they had a butler, but also, that they liked timeless things from the 30s 40s and 50s.  (e.g. Dennis Potter's Pennies from Heaven the The Singing Detective, which use music from the 30s and 40s.)  

Combine that with Haun's comments that Nagel is probably sipping martinis with David Niven in heaven, and one can pretty easily imagine that Pat liked Billie Holiday and her style.

I see a bit of Billie Holiday influence in this piece, but that may just be wishful thinking.

I agree with Nagelite; I think Mirage was doing well enough and Pat was selling well enough that they felt like they could afford to do a print or two that looked less like it was being sponsored by a corporation or business.  The next piece. Mirage, was the first since Mirage Ship where Mirage promoted itself.  

Still, a part of me hopes there is a woman out there that Pat painted who had a thing for daffodils.  It is not the usual flower I would expect to see in a woman's hair like a few others (e.g.orchid, rose, or hibiscus, daises).

Cheers,

NA



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#5 [url]

Mar 7 13 7:22 AM

Billie Holiday!  Yes!  I bet you a shiny dollar Pat was either using a photo from the same session taken of Billie Holiday as NA found, or he recreated the session using one of his models.  At the very least, he was inspired by Billie Holiday with a daffodil in her hair when he created Lorraine.


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Mar 9 13 8:35 AM

As an update, I was looking up Tracy Vaccaro, one of Nagel most oft used models, who was also a Playboy Playmate, and what should pop up but a woman who goes by then tag "Lorraine81."  Upon looking at her tweets, I found she was joining just a few of her pals for some sort of cosmetics thing, and it was basically a who's who of Nagel models: Cathy St George, Shannon Tweed, and Tracy Vaccaro.

As it turns out, Lorraine was an actress and model, is from the U.K, and was the Playboy Playmate for April 1981, four months before "Lorraine" was released as a print.

She is in one of top 50 favorite films, Terrence Davies' Distant Voices; Still Lives.

I have asked her on her twitter feed is she is the model for the print.  She hasn't tweeted in months, so I may not hear back, but it seemed to coincidental, and as much as I do not see Heidi Sorensen when I look at Nagel's Heidi, I do not really see Lorraine Michaels when I look at Nagel's Lorriane.

If I get confirmation that she was the model, I will put her picture in this thread.  If not, you can always Google her. Just remember that a lot of her images are NSFW.  I made that mistake once when I was innocently looking up Cathy St George.  :)


NA

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