Remove this ad

Lead

Apr 22 09 8:54 PM

Tags : :

Welcome to the Patrick Nagel Forum where you can discuss the works of Patrick Nagel, ask questions, and learn about the man and his art.

This forum is a fan-run site.  That is, it neither has the blessings nor the curse of the Nagel estate or any of the publications who used Pat's work.  The purpose of this forum is to educate and inspire members of this forum as well as visitors simply passing by.

The book, The Art of Patrick Nagel, contains a very brief biography of the man.  For a shorter version, here is my own:  Nagel was an artist who burned like a roman candle -- brightly for a very brief period of time.  The span that Nagel created his distinctive images is short indeed -- from about 1977 to his death in early 1984.  In less than an eight year period, he created all of the distinctive, iconic images that are both despised and loved so very strongly. 

Please share your thoughts and participate in the topics.  We are glad you are here! 


Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Remove this ad

#1 [url]

May 10 09 4:21 PM

Here is some information from Wikipedia about Patrick Nagel that has more information than the usual biography:

Patrick Nagel (November 25, 1945 - February 4, 1984) was an American artist. He created popular illustrations on board, paper, and canvas, most of which emphasize the simple grace of and beauty of the female form, in a distinctive style descended from Art Deco. He is best known for his illustrations for Playboy magazine, and the pop group Duran Duran, for whom he designed the cover of the best selling album Rio.

Biography

Nagel was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1945, but was raised and spent most of his life in the Los Angeles area. After serving as a Ranger in Vietnam[1], Nagel attended the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles in 1969, and in that same year he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from California State University, Fullerton.

In 1971, Nagel worked as a graphic designer for ABC Television, producing graphics for promotions and news broadcasts. The following year, he began work as a freelance artist for major corporations and magazines, including Architectural Digest, Harper's Magazine, IBM, ITT Corporation, MGM, Oui, Rolling Stone, United Artists, and Universal Studios.

In 1976, Nagel began to regularly contribute images to Playboy magazine, which improved his exposure and the popularity of "the Nagel Woman" image to a huge audience. In 1978, he made his first poster image for Mirage Editions, with whom he would print many Nagel women images.
Nagel's 1982 painting for the album cover of rock group Duran Duran's hit album Rio would become one of his best known images.

He also worked for many commercial clients, including Intel, Lucky Strike cigarettes, and Budweiser. As his popularity grew he began offering limited edition prints of his work.
In 1984, at the age of 38, the artist participated in a 15-minute celebrity "Aerobathon" to raise funds for the American Heart Association. Afterwards, he was found dead in his car, and doctors determined by autopsy that he had suffered a heart attack.

At the time of his death, over 80,000 people owned one of Nagel's limited-edition prints or best-selling lithographs.

Style

Nagel would start with a photograph and work down, always simplifying and removing elements which he felt were unnecessary. The resulting image would look flat, but emphasized those elements which he felt were most important.

According to Elena G. Millie, curator of the poster collection at the Library of Congress:

Like some of the old print masters (Toulouse-Lautrec and Bonnard, for example), Nagel was influenced by the Japanese woodblock print, with figures silhouetted against a neutral background, with strong areas of black and white, and with bold line and unusual angles of view. He handled colors with rare originality and freedom; he forced perspective from flat, two-dimensional images; and he kept simplifying, working to get more across with fewer elements. His simple and precise imagery is also reminiscent of the art-deco style of the 1920s and 1930s- its sharp linear treatment, geometric simplicity, and stylization of form yield images that are formal yet decorative.

Nagel's figures generally have black hair, bright white skin, full-lipped mouths, and the distinctive Nagel eyes, which are often squared off in the later works. Because of the intense stylization and reduction of facial features into clean lines, generally the figures resemble each other, though Nagel worked with many models, including Playboy Playmates Cathy St. George, Tracy Vaccaro and Shannon Tweed. Nagel also painted several celebrity portraits including those of Joan Collins (whose portrait was subsequently released as a limited edition print) and Joanna Cassidy.

While Nagel's work is mostly represented by aloof, if also seductive women, they are rarely, if ever, presented in a submissive relationship with men.[citation needed] These are highly sexual, but empowered and intelligent women. Nagel also painted men, though only one was ever released as a fine art print while Nagel was alive. He had and continues to have a devoted following of collectors.  Nagel's artwork strongly influenced the illustration and clip art of the late 1980s and illustrations of women strongly resembling those seen in Nagel's art were widely used in hair and nail salons and other beauty-oriented businesses.

Quote    Reply   

#3 [url]

May 16 09 7:30 PM

Aaron and Lindy,

If I have not already done so, let me welcome you as members of the forum!

I have no idea what happened to the old site (www.patricknagel.com).  My imagination tends to run wild, so I will not even guess.  This is a young forum, and I am hoping that former contributors to the old forum will post here.   Eventually, I think they will.  Mark Walker was always a knowledgeable contributor, and I hope he will do so again.  To the best of my ability, I am trying to recreate his most important postings.

Although you did not ask, I tried to research a site to host the forum that seemed to have both longevity and would allow for members and guests to easily contribute.  Lefora seemed to best fit that bill.  So far, when there have been glitches, Lefora has been responsive.  I tried to help start another forum at another site, but that site quickly and unexplainably shut down within a matter of months.  So -- we are now here!

Thank you for being here!  I am looking forward to hosting another exciting Patrick Nagel forum!


Quote    Reply   

#4 [url]

Jun 8 09 10:31 PM

Aaron,

I answered this in another section, too, but I figured I better answer this when it pops up at least twice.  ;)

The former Patrick Nagel site had some type of error occur that took the discussion boards with it.
The estate is now giving Facebook a try and some fans are connecting there, but one must be a member of Facebook.  Also, the manner in which I originally posted print information at the old site (insert photo, then write the print info, then comments) isn't really possible on a Facebook fan site unless one is the admin, which I am not.  Facebook fanpages are great for discussion, but not an on-line print/poster/graphic reference, which is what I always wanted and what, frankly is needed to keep ill-informed Nagel sellers from posting false information about the prints they are listsing on eBay and CraigsList.



Quote    Reply   

#5 [url]

Jun 22 09 11:23 PM

Aaron,
I answered this in another section, too, but I figured I better answer this when it pops up at least twice.  ;)
The former Patrick Nagel site had some type of error occur that took the discussion boards with it.The estate is now giving Facebook a try and some fans are connecting there, but one must be a member of Facebook.  Also, the manner in which I originally posted print information at the old site (insert photo, then write the print info, then comments) isn't really possible on a Facebook fan site unless one is the admin, which I am not.  Facebook fanpages are great for discussion, but not an on-line print/poster/graphic reference, which is what I always wanted and what, frankly is needed to keep ill-informed Nagel sellers from posting false information about the prints they are listsing on eBay and CraigsList.

-nagel-angel

I agree.  Thanks for the info N-A.  Thanks for the great posts.  You too Seatedman.

Quote    Reply   

#6 [url]

Aug 21 09 1:23 PM

Thank you for creating this site! The work of Patrick Nagel is both a fascination and obsession to me and I really value having a place to share and comment on his work once again. Looks like I'm in good company here.

Mike

Quote    Reply   

#7 [url]

Aug 30 09 1:45 PM

It is good to be back here after a crazy couple of months.

So many new people have joined since I last posted. I want to personally welcome Andy, Mmmike, Pin-up-boy, Bemews, Daqcraig, Assigaroramit, Fotolecob, Joey32555, Peterk, Jim, Stgypsy7 and Liluadc to the forums. You have made some amazing posts, and shared some amazing images.

Thank you, and welcome!

Quote    Reply   

#9 [url]

Feb 3 10 8:28 AM

Good point Nagelicious, I would also suggest that everyone try to come up with their own "unique" user name...don't just copy another member's name and add a number to it....LOL

Quote    Reply   

#10 [url]

Feb 12 10 9:50 PM

I enjoy popping in here to see new faces.  Even though I might not post as much as I would like, it gratifies me to see people coming in to participate.  A hearty, but belated welcome to Eboyd, Rickysinzxxx, Oceanra, Dhar, Gobearspac10, Davidandjoni, Niji, and Evellynn!  Thank you for being here!

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad

#12 [url]

Jul 4 10 8:46 AM

Thank you for creating this forum Nagelite (it seems to be the only one on the net!), i discovered nagel's works only a few days ago while i was looking at the cover of duran duran's rio, so i though to myself, who's the man behind this beautiful print? well what can i say i  immediately fell in love with his works and now i'm here enjoying this forum.

Quote    Reply   

#13 [url]

Jul 4 10 9:24 AM

This is one of the best forums I’ve been on.  Very Informative and the people are great and have a wealth of information too!

On a side note:

Here are a couple other areas you may want to look at, as some of the people here, are there. Or it’s their site/business  and has some great images to view.

http://the80sgallery.blogspot.com/

http://www.justlookinggallery.com/artists/nagel/index.php

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Patrick-Nagel/23589309942

http://www.tbfa.com/nagel/index.nagel.html

And of course:

http://www.patricknagel.com/index.html

Two areas I like to check up on every now and then:

http://www.artbrokerage.com/artist/nagel/Patrick-Nagel/

http://fineart.ha.com/common/search_results.php?ic=althome3-homepage_search&Nty=1&Ntk=SI_Titles&Ntt=Patrick+Nagel&N=50+793+794+792

Lilu

Quote    Reply   

#15 [url]

Aug 25 12 1:06 AM

Hello everyone. 

Regarding Patrick Nagel, (biography, I supppose,) I invite you to check out a short article published in the issue of Palm Springs Life Magazine (May 1984 -- although the cover actually misprinted May 1983) that featured his last commissioned commercial piece of art on the cover.  Not a really informative article, but quotes from his "friends" and clients might be interesting to some...? 

I worked with Mirage, as they were tightening the noose on Pat and his work.  They were rigid and unfriendly and by that time, I don't believe Pat was happy either.  I spoke with Pat the day before he perrished ... what a loss at such a very young age.  They didn't allow 75 percent of the article as originally written.  Along with the quotes from Mirage's Bornstein, I had interviewed Pat for nearly four hours and included ALOT of his views.  It also had commentary from his mother and memories of his youth. 

After his death, both Mirage and his family refused to speak further with myself or the magazine.  Tsk, tsk, tsk.  Greed, what it does to people...

I received a serigraph of the cover of the Magazine as a thank you from his mother. I own one other serigraph and should I be able to photograph them, I shall post them in the appropriate place. 

Wow, thanks for letting me tell that story, had no idea it was all pent up inside me!  My screen name speaks volumes I think...
Cheers and paint the world in your own colors....
                                                  Nagelwomanwannabee

Quote    Reply   

#16 [url]

Aug 25 12 1:38 AM

Nagelwomanwannabee,

Welcome to the forum!  We'd love to read your stories here.  I have that copy of PSL, which was a challenge to obtain all these years later.  I would also love to hear further comments from you.  I talked with Karl once and found him and his assistance to be prickly and hostile.  I used to talk with Jennifer periodically and she was always very friendly and warm.

Pat's biography is too short.  Adding more to it would be most appreciated.

Cheers,

NA

Quote    Reply   

#17 [url]

Aug 25 12 12:06 PM

Hi Nagelwomanwannabee,

This is going to be a long shot but would you happen to have saved the interview/article in it's entirety as intended before it was edited and published? I will second what nagel-angel said and would love to hear any stories you have including anything that may not have been shared or published in the past. There is so little information from Pat in his own words out there. 

Thank you,

mmmike

Quote    Reply   

#20 [url]

Nov 5 12 10:35 AM

Hi all,

For the last year or so I've been enjoying the discussion on this forum, and in particular, the historical knowledge provided by Nagelite and Nagel-Angel.  Just curious, is it public knowledge who either of them our?  (If not, I understand but just wanted to know if it were.)  More specifically, are both just obsessed collectors like the rest of us, or were the involved with Pat or Mirage in some capacity.  I ask because I'm very impressed by both the depth of their knowledge, but in regards to the art itself and the way it was produced and distributed.

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help